One dark October night the bullied 16-year-old Hugo disappears on board the Gotland ferry. A storm is raging and a witness says she saw him out on deck, but her story is hushed up. The search is eventually called off, but Hugo’s sister can’t stop wondering: What really happened to her little brother?

Tomas Hartman is bogged down in the investigation of a murder – an elderly school photographer who was brutally attacked in his home. His photo archive was ravaged by fire and no motive can be found. Then Hartman’s own mother is assaulted and left to die in the forest, and Hartman becomes more and more preoccupied by personal concerns. When Maria Wern takes over the case, an e-mail turns up with an attached video filmed through a window into her bedroom, and she is forced to realize the power this gives the sender. “Perhaps this is the only weapon that will be needed in the future,” her associate speculates. “… public shaming.”

Anna Jansson’s crime novel Everyone Can See You is about what can happen when the most private matters risk being posted on the Internet. With a simple click on “send” a personal secret can become public knowledge. What are we prepared to do, to protect ourselves from disgrace?

Pages 287

Rights sold

Finland: Gummerus
Sweden: Norstedts

REVIEWS

“Anna Jansson smartly and well thought out plays with the misuse and the exploitation of the public room through times.”
Dagens Nyheter / Sweden

“Godamn it, this story is thrilling the whole way through.”
Stories from the city, blog / Sweden

“I love to get drawn into a book, and that is exactly how this is. It’s excitement and suspense from page one. It is not only a crime novel. It is also a raw depiction of beeing outcast wieved from all different persectives, showing all levels, I am moved and filled with new thinking.”
Dagens bok / Sweden

“Anna Jansson is a driven crime writer who knows the art of telling a story while she makes the reader think open minded.”
Ölandsbladet / Sweden

“Anna Jansson starts immediately to weave a plot using strings from people’s everyday life and – as always – a current social issue.”
Kristiansbladet / Sweden