EYE OF THE NIGHT (NATTENS ÖGA)

Cilla & Rolf Börjlind

Alina is escaping the war in Ukraine with her little son Oleksiy. At the Polish border, she is offered a ride to Sweden by two men and a woman. But soon the car stops on a deserted forest road. Oleksij is sent out to play with the woman, while the two men tell Alina what they require to drive them on.

Olivia Rönning and her colleauge Lisa Hedqvist  are interviewing Ukrainian refugees and making documentation of possible abuses during the war and along the escape routes. They hear about a criminal network that organizes human trafficking. Soon after, they raid an apartment used for sex trafficking and rescue a woman and her child from there.

Tom Stilton’s partner Luna realizes that he has lied to her and that he has probably killed a person who should have been brought to justice. And worse, he doesn’t seem to feel guilty about it. Luna feels discomfort and when Philippine police come to Stockholm to ask questions about the murder, everything surfaces. Can she ever trust Tom again? Can she even love such a man?

A man falls from a roof in central Stockholm and dies. A witness sees him being chased by two men shortly before the death. Before the dead man can be identified or autopsied, his body is stolen from the morgue. Who was he and who wants the police not to find out?

Without warning, Tom and Olivia’s friend Abbas el-Fassi is suddenly visited in Stockholm by his mother Drishti, with whom he lost contact in Marseille when he was just a child. She tells him that he has a half-sister, Julie, whose father is a wealthy Russian born man, Grigory. Now Drishti is being stalked by some who works for Grigory and she asks Abbas for help to sort out the situation. But why has Grigorij sent men to Stockholm?

The clues lead to a luxury yacht on the French Riviera and a priceless treasure: a Fabergé egg called the Eye of the Night.

Pages: tba

Rights

Denmark: Gyldendal
Finland: Schildts & Söderström
Germany: Btb
The Netherlands: AW Bruna
Norway: Gyldendal
Slovak Republic: Ikar
Sweden: Norstedts

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